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Trivia Question of the Month: Thanksgiving Side Dishes
Testimonial: "Knowledgeable and Efficient Service"
The Hand
Turkey Tight End
The 1st Thanksgiving Seems Like Yesterday
Open Enrollment
Video: Two Hours of Thanksgiving Music
Thanksgiving Puzzle (100 Pieces)
Elaine's Recipe of the Month: Pumpkin Doughnut Muffins
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Trivia Question of the Month: Thanksgiving Side Dishes

Thanksgiving Side Dishes

Other than Stuffing/Dressing, what is the most popular Thanksgiving side dish?

A: Green Bean Casserole

B: Mashed Potatoes

C: Mac & Cheese

D: Candied Yams

E: Cranberry Sauce
 
Click here for the answer 

Testimonial--"Knowledgeable and Efficient Service"
 
First and foremost, I would like to thank Ron for his prompt, knowledgeable and efficient service. Placement for Medicare options was painless as I was informed of options based on my needs and once the decision made, a simple application and done! There will be many referrals from me as others are already asking based on what has been told of your services!

Regards,

Ellen Smith
Monroe, GA 



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The Hand      A Hand      
When Mrs. Klein told her first graders to draw a picture of something they were thankful for, she thought how little these children, who lived in a deteriorating neighborhood, had to be thankful for.
  
She knew that most of the class would draw pictures of turkeys or of bountifully laden Thanksgiving tables. That was what they believed was expected of them.

What surprised Mrs. Klein was Douglas's picture. His drawing was simply a hand, but whose hand? The class was captivated by his image. "I think it must be the hand of God that brings us food," said one student.

"It must be a farmer's hand," said another, "because they grow the turkeys."

"it looks like a policeman, since they protect us," said Shirley.
After she started the class on another project Mrs. Klein bent over Douglas's desk and asked whose hand it was.

Douglas mumbled. "It's yours, teacher."

Then Mrs. Klein remembered that she had taken Douglas by the hand from time to time, as she often did with the children.

She didn't realize that it had meant so much to Douglas.

Perhaps, she reflected, this was her Thanksgiving, and everyone's Thanksgiving - not the material things given to us, but the small ways that we give something to others.

  Cartoon        
Turkey Tight End Turkey Catching a Ball       
The Philadelphia Eagles had just finished their daily practice session when a large turkey came strutting onto the field. While the players gazed in amazement, the turkey walked up to the head coach and demanded to be given a chance to play at tight end.

Everyone stared in silence as the turkey caught pass after pass and ran right through the defensive line. When the turkey returned to the sidelines, the coach shouted, 'You're superb. Sign up for the season, and I'll see to it that you get a huge bonus.'

'Forget the bonus,' replied the turkey, 'What I want to know is, does your season go past Thanksgiving Day?'


  Boy with Turkey Painted on Face       
  Historical Thanksgiving Feast       


Dear Clients & Friends,


Gratitude and thanksgiving are important traits to practice during trials and difficulties. With all the possible themes and priorities available to us as we chose which holidays to observe, isn't it amazing that Americans developed a holiday around giving thanks?

I hope you'll make use of the holiday focus and really ask yourself what you are grateful for. I am grateful I've been able to help so many in my insurance business.

If you need any help securing an insurance policy or if you simply have questions, please call me. I am ready for your phone call.

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Sincerely,  
Ron Dutton
678-464-8602 

The 1st Thanksgiving Seems Like Yesterday

Datong Area Yungang Grottoes
Structure built around the time of the 1st Thanksgiving

The following article was written by Charles J. Chamberlain who lives in Beijing, China

We often think of U.S. history as being quite ancient. In 1621 our earliest settlers, the Pilgrims of Massachusetts, sat down for a meal with Chief Massasoit of the Wompanoag tribe. This friendly encounter marked a significant milestone in the eventual birth of our nation, a whopping 155 years into the future.

Occasionally it is good to be reminded that the rest of the world's definition of antiquity is vastly different from America's. We are truly a nation in our infancy. This was brought home to me recently on a trip to the Yungang Grottoes in China's Datong region. The grottoes are magnificent caves with carved versions of Buddha covering every inch of the walls and ceilings. Walking into one of these 1,600-year-old grottoes is a step into another world.

It's no wonder the residents of the area spent a great deal of time and effort to preserve these elaborate ancient caves. They erected ornate wooden facades at the front of some of the more vulnerable caves, protecting the artwork within from the ravages of sun, wind and moisture.

But the most mind-boggling realization came when I looked at the sign outside of one of these wooden structures. It was built in 1651 AD! In other words, it was the "recent" inhabitants of the area (370 years ago), who were concerned with preserving "ancient" artifacts. This time-bending phenomenon is repeated all over China. In DunHuang, tour guides are almost apologetic when asked about "recent" preservation efforts, even when those efforts were done hundreds of years ago.

What was the rest of the world doing in the early 17th century when Chief Massasoit sat down for that famous meal?

1602: William Shakespeare wrote All's Well That Ends Well.
1603: A frail Queen Elizabeth died at age 69. King James VI of Scotland became James I, King of England.
1604: James disliked England's Puritans but agreed to their request for an official translation of the Bible - to be known as the Authorized King James Bible.
1606: The Dutch "discovered" northern Australia - at what today is called Cape York Peninsula.
1628: William Harvey discovered blood circulation in the human body.
1639: Rene Descartes philosophies entered Dutch universities. Descartes advocated disciplined philosophical argumentation integrated with physical science.

Time is relative. Recognizing the relative newness of our nation can help us better respond to present-day challenges in the realm of foreign relations. In addition, thinking of Thanksgiving as having recent origins can help us appreciate our heritage.

Open Enrollment

Enrollment Table

Fall has arrived and so have this year's health insurance enrollment periods. This year the Annual Election Period for Medicare began on Monday, (October 15) and will run through December 7th.

The Open Enrollment Period for the Affordable Care Act (often referred to as Obamacare) will run from November 1, 2019 through December 15, 2019.

This year we have a satellite office available throughout the enrollment periods, inside the Kroger store at 505 Dacula Road, Dacula, GA (corner of Dacula Rd. & Fence Rd.) to better assist those who will need help and advice in making their choices, and enrolling. We will be at the Kroger location on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 1:00pm until 5:00pm throughout the enrollment period, except during Thanksgiving week.

Video: Two Hours of Thanksgiving Music

Thanksgiving Playlist: Classical Music for Holiday Meals
Thanksgiving Playlist: Classical Music for Holiday Meals

Thanksgiving Puzzle (100 Pieces)

Thanksgiving Bounty
Elaine's Recipe of the Month  

Pumpkin Doughnut Muffins
Elaine Dutton 
Ingredients:  
For the Batter 
10 tablespoons (1 ¼ sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature, plus more for pan 
3 cups all-purpose flour (spooned and leveled), plus more for pan
2 ½ teaspoons baking powder 
¼ teaspoon baking soda 
1 teaspoon coarse salt 
½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
¼ teaspoon ground allspice 
1/3 cup buttermilk 
1 ¼ cups pure pumpkin puree (from a 15 ounce can) 
¾ cup light brown sugar 
2 large eggs 
For the Sugar Coating
¾ cup granulated sugar 
2 ½ teaspoons ground cinnamon
¼ cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour 12 standard muffin cups. Make batter: In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, nutmeg and allspice. In a small bowl whisk together buttermilk and pumpkin puree. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat butter and brown sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a time, scraping down bowl as needed. With mixer on low, add flour mixture in three additions, alternating with two additions pumpkin mixture, and beat to combine.

2. Spoon 1/3 cup batter into each muffin cup and bake until a toothpick inserted in center of a muffin comes out clean, 30 minutes. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, combine granulated sugar and cinnamon. Let muffins cool 10 minutes in pan on a wire rack. Working with one at a time, remove muffins from pan, brush all over with butter, then toss to coat in sugar mixture. Let muffins cool completely on wire rack.
 
Enjoy!